DPF / Milton

For the milkmaid, the plowman, the mower and the shepherd, from The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Fourth Edition, Volume 1.

from L’Allegro / by John Milton

Such sights as youthful poets dream
On summer eves by haunted stream.
Then to the well-trod stage anon.
If Jonson’s learned sock be on,
Or sweetest Shakespeare, fancy’s child,
Warble his native wood-notes wild.

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DPF / Herrick

For honoring whatever you believe in, from a poet who believes in God, for Thanksgiving, from poetryfoundation.org.

from A Thanksgiving to God, for his House / by Robert Herrick (1591–1674)

Lord, Thou hast given me a cell
         Wherein to dwell,
A little house, whose humble roof
         Is weather-proof:
Under the spars of which I lie
         Both soft, and dry;
Where Thou my chamber for to ward
         Hast set a guard
Of harmless thoughts, to watch and keep
         Me, while I sleep.

DPF / Shakespeare

For a favorite poem of late autumn, from late summer, and from The Norton Introduction to Literature, Ninth Edition, edited by Alison Booth, J. Paul Hunter, and Kelly J. Mays.

from [That time of year thou mayst in me behold] / by William Shakespeare, 1609

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.

DPF / Marvell

PIA: from July 29, 2014. For slow-lier and slow-lier sailing through summer.

Instead of the poem about his coy mistress, here’s one from The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 4th edition, edited by Ferguson, Salter, and Stallworthy (1970). More on Marvell here:
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/andrew-marvell

from Bermudas / by Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)

From a small boat that rowed along,
The listening winds received this song:

DPF / Milton

For Day 15, feeling Miltonic. From Paradise Lost.

from Paradise Lost: Book 1 / by John Milton

                   What in me is dark
Illumin, what is low raise and support;
That to the highth of this great Argument
I may assert Eternal Providence,
And justifie the wayes of God to men.